The London, Brighton & South Coast Railway

Introduction

The UK's London, Brighton and South Coast Railway (known as the LB&SCR or Brighton Line) was formed on 27th July 1846 by the amalgamation of the London & Brighton Railway and the London & Croydon Railway. At its peak the railway formed a triangle with its base along the south coast from Portsmouth to Hastings and its apex in London.

The line was amalgamated along with four other major companies (the London & South Western Railway; the South Eastern Railway; the London Chatham & Dover Railway; and the South Eastern & Chatham Railway), and a number of minor ones, into the Southern Railway by Act of Parliament with effect from 1st January 1923.

The LB&SCR inspired a great loyalty among its staff and supporters, lasting well after most visible remnants had disappeared. This was primarily due to the beautiful yellow ochre livery carried by the locomotives in the William Stroudley & Robert Billinton periods. Several locomotives have been preserved and some are still running today on heritage railways.

There have been many books published over the years of the different aspects of the railway company which shows the continuing interest. There is an historical society (the Brighton Circle) which continues researching the old Brighton Line and publishing their knowledge. Many modellers have also been inspired to recreate the atmosphere of the LB&SCR supported by an active "cottage-industry" of models and parts, often aided by advice from members of the Circle.